Crowning Connections: Building Your Team with Terry Scalzitti

General Manager of Monarch Roofing, Rob Clemons, has been in discussion with Terry Scalzitti of Ocean View Baptist Church about Leadership. On this episode of Crowning Connections you will hear points on building your team, practical management through a pandemic, the character of a leader, community commitment and even some book suggestions!

This is an episode you don’t want to miss!

Listen in!

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Rob Clemons
Welcome to Crown Connections with Monarch Roofing Rob Clemons. Today, I’m very excited, we actually have the opportunity to talk about something that I think it’s very near and dear to my heart. We’re going to talk a little bit about team building and management in general businesses, because all too often we get stuck as managers, as businesses, just going through the day to day grind of things. And we forget what’s so important, which is, you know, motivating your team members, making sure that they understand a clear direction, creating a company culture, and always following through with it. So we’re going to talk a little bit about this today. And I’m very, very excited to have Pastor Terry from Ocean View Baptist Church.

Terry Scalzitti
That’s right. How you doing Rob?

Rob Clemons
Hey, I’m doing very well. And it’s and you know, I’ve been talking with you for a little while, you know, we’ve been talking about doing something like this for a little while. So I’m just so excited to have you on here and, and the motivation that you can bring to people just hearing you from afar.

Terry Scalzitti
It’s great to be here. Definitely.

Rob Clemons
Yeah. Awesome. Awesome. Well, let’s just jump right in and tell me a little bit about Ocean View Baptist Church, and what makes you guys special out there.

Terry Scalzitti
Yeah, I celebrated eight years, believe it or not, last week here in Myrtle Beach came from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. And Ocean View is, it’s amazing over the years, to be able to see the spirit of the church and where it sits today. I’ve said before in 20 plus years of doing ministry, to be able to see not only from a staff standpoint, but also from a church standpoint, really the sweetest season of my life. Now I say season because we know as leaders, seasons change, and and so while I celebrate right now, there’s always dynamics that can hit a staff team, there’s dynamics that can hit a church that always can take it up to high mountaintops and low to low valleys. And as a leader, you’ve got to recognize you know what, celebrate it while you have it, and then be ready for the next transition whenever that comes.

Rob Clemons
You know, that’s a powerful message for all managers, you know, because I feel like when everybody’s ran a little too high, sometimes you got to know when to pull them back a little bit and get the expectations more realistic. And sometimes when people get low, we have to be able to pick them up, right?

Terry Scalzitti
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. And, you know, you think about that, from the pandemic standpoint, that was one of the most challenging things for leaders is because we had never faced that pandemic. Nobody had ever lived through or led through a pandemic before. So a really it was, while you say, you know, we, as leaders, we have experienced, we know, okay, don’t let him get too low on this, don’t let him get too high on this. But the last couple of years have been challenging, even for leaders, because while we’re leading them and not letting them get too low or too high, we also don’t know what to expect. And that is something that has been different because leaders study, leaders understand trends. But with the pandemic, none of us knew what was coming. But that’s where leaders really step into the void and just help to calm the waters.

Rob Clemons
I totally agree. You know, it’s so interesting, because you we got into a situation where, you know, you always look back, they say, you know, those who don’t remember history, you’re can you know, you’re basically doomed to repeat it. But we don’t have history to go by, you know, that there wasn’t anything like this, at least in the modern era, for sure. So it led to a lot of challenges. Tell me at the church, how did you guys deal with, you know, people not being able to come to work because of, you know, getting a COVID diagnosis, or, you know, just trying to protect other people, you know, how did you guys adjust?

Terry Scalzitti
It was challenging, because while you have your negatives, in that, you know, every week you’re learning on the fly, and sometimes you make great decisions on the fly, sometimes you make really poor ones, and you’re doing the best that you can. But what I found that really helped not only our team, but other teams and our church specifically is, is when something like this hits, and the team is rattled a little bit. They’re a little bit more attuned to their leader. They really need their leader. And I noticed that like never before, because they really look to me for the answers. Now, that’s exciting, in some sense of you love to be a leader. But it’s also challenging when you understand that I don’t always have all the answers. And these people are depending upon me to be able to give them guidance and wisdom. And that’s a heavy mantle. Those are sleepless nights to be able to take that. But when you receive that, and you realize, you know, the truth of the matter is, is that I’m not going to be perfect, I’m not going to have all the answers. And all I can do is work hard and really be transparent and authentic with my team and be able to try to have a team approach to the situation. And if you have the right team and some of the things we know we’re going to talk about today, if you have the right team and can pull from your team, the right decisions, the right wisdom, believe it or not, you probably can weather the storm and I know at our church, we did and it was absolutely incredible. And in fact, I would say this, you know, we made some really, really strong decisions up front ones that were countercultural around the country. But we had our answers. We had our stats, we had our figures, we were taking everything into account. And yesterday we had a meeting where we looked at our statistics over the last four years and to be able to celebrate being way ahead of the curve with regards to churches around the country, with regards to attendance, with regards to you know, getting our people back into the building back in community, back in rhythm, and a lot of those decisions we made early on helped us get to that point. So it was great to be with the team and to celebrate those things.

Rob Clemons
It’s incredible because what you find yourself having to do as manager, especially in a time like this, when you don’t know for sure what the proper course of action is, is where you you have to make a plan, that you’re you’re steady enough on that you don’t just abandon it immediately. But also being adaptable enough to realize when the plan isn’t necessarily the right plan, and you have to make an adjustment, I find that to be a big challenge. Did you get with the staff at times and just say, hey, we were going to do this thing. But but now that I’m looking at it, we need to make a quick correction.

Terry Scalzitti
Yeah, absolutely. And I think, Robin, I know you and I’ve talked a lot about this. But you know, as you gain experience as a leader, and I typically say the more more you think, you know, the more you don’t know, and and only through age and experience, do you realize, you know what, I’m not the sharpest tool in the shed, you know, there, I’m gonna make a lot of mistakes. And when that humility hits you, and you lead with humility, your team can see that, and they don’t look at it as a weakness. Instead, they realize, you know what, I can take steps of faith. And even if I make a mistake, my leader is not going to jump down my throat, he’s giving me an opportunity to be able to voice my opinion. And if it doesn’t work, that’s okay. And I think sometimes you pull the best out of your team when they feel comfortable enough to take bold steps. And I know our team did that. And thankfully, for the most part, I’m pretty patient with them. And we kind of work together with

Rob Clemons
that, for the most part. Oh, that sounds like something good that I need to know. No. That’s awesome. You know, we I think you and I have talked before this thing here at work, that it’s a little bit of a cultural thing for me, you know, I understand people are gonna make mistakes, sometimes. And I embrace those mistakes, because I believe you’ll learn from those mistakes. But I do have some things that I’m looking for everybody every day, I call it pap. It’s professionalism, enthusiasm, positivity. Anybody who sit in the room, that’s a member of my staff is probably rolling their eyes like, yes, Rod, we’ve heard this 100 times. But that’s important to me. Because those are the things that I look at and say, if you exhibit those every day, you’re going to be alright, and that’s going to grow. And that’s, and that’s something that people can get behind. Do you have anything like this with your with your staff? Yeah, we

Terry Scalzitti
same along the same lines, obviously, and what guides us obviously, we’re faith based. And so that guides us and so, you know, we kind of say, well, of course, we’re going to be positive because you know, of who we serve, and that that’s our motto as we go along. But on top of that, it really it boils down to a trusting team, where we you know, there’s a little bit of a guidance that we go through through Scripture where we say, you know, do not consider others or do not consider yourself better than others. But instead consider others better than your than yourself. And so when you lead with sacrificial humility, and when, when you don’t approach someone out of a position of power, but you approach someone out of humility, and that takes security, then you trust one another a little bit more as a team. Now, it’s a little different in the church world, because we all kind of have a the ability to be understand, hey, there’s a bottom line that we all when we work here, we all, you know, are attuned to this. But that helps us to be able to trust one another as a team. And that trust really, really guides us because that gives us the ability to lead and to make decisions the way we want to as opposed to kind of what you said, if we have a staff or team member, that kind of, you know, just doesn’t honor trust, then it really disrupts the team. And that’s like yours with positivity, if you have a team member that is not positive and not excited and not in it, that can really wear on the team. So I think it kind of speaks to that same value.

Rob Clemons
You know, it’s it’s interesting, because you said something a minute ago, and it made me think of Jordan Peterson out if you’re reading his stuff, he’s a clinical psychologist, and he speaks about when you’re talking to someone, assume they know something that you don’t. And that’s tough, you know, because a lot of times we talk to people, as if we’re the subject matter, expert on it. And we we always make that kind of internal assumption that, ‘oh, well, I know more than this person.’ I mean, you know, if I’m talking with, well, Stephen Hawking can’t talk with him anymore. But but if I were, you know, it’s like, I’m going to assume he knows more about physics. But can you imagine if you get in there, and you start talking about Big Bang theory with Stephen Hawkins, there’s gonna be a problem, right?

Terry Scalzitti
Yeah. That’s true. Well, and I would, I would echo that. And I would say this, and I think it comes with a little bit of age and experiences. You know, I’ve been in the room with some amazing thinkers. And I’ve come to realize that what makes them special is they don’t take themselves too seriously. They’re always willing to learn even from someone 1015 years younger than them. They embody that principle. You just spoke up where they come in, and they go, Hey, tell me about you. Is there anything that that you do that I would love to learn from and when you realize that, that a great leader is always a learning leader, then you don’t always walk into a room thinking, you know, at all, in fact, that that doesn’t suit you? Well, because then you stop learning?

Rob Clemons
Absolutely. Yeah. That one of the first steps of wisdom is understand that you don’t know everything. Right. Right. So well, that’s great. How many members do you guys have at your church?

Terry Scalzitti
We were right before the pandemic, we had about 2000 people on a monthly basis attending the church, we’re about 89% back that was one of the statistics we celebrated yesterday, which is far above the averages in the country, you know, post pandemic. So I would probably say anywhere from 15 to 1800 that we have right now, I’m not a mathematician, but I think that’s close to it. But I would say that on a monthly basis, we have coming back to the church, which is pretty exciting.

Rob Clemons
man that That’s inspiring. You know, I think I told you before, I’m the son of a preacher. And so I know how hard you guys work, you know, you work really hard on trying to inspire the people. And part of that inspiration is what brings people back to the church and the feeling of the community. And, and also, I think the, you know, it’s interesting, because my Father, one of the things I began to realize as a young kid is that he has to run it like a business. You talked about trust, and trust being so important to every business, I feel like that, you know, if you can look at all your teammates, and you say, Well, you know, maybe I don’t understand why they made that move. But I trust that they did it for the right reason. That goes a long way. Which leads me straight into what I want to talk about with you today a little bit is, is building your team properly. And some of the things that you share with me before? How do you know that you’ve got a good fit with people on your staff? I mean, do you what kinds of ways to get through that from testing to interviewing or anything like that?

Terry Scalzitti
Well, first thing you learn right away as is you really don’t know, right off the bat, you know, you know, people that you think, Oh, this is a perfect fit, and the first two weeks Oh, they’re going to be great. Sometimes they haven’t turned out, okay. And sometimes even the first couple months, over the long haul, though, and you know, might say,”Well, what kind of brings it to that point?” We kind of look at a few, you know, diagnostics that we give them. We look at some of the ways in which they handle themselves. Some of the things we’ve already spoken about here. Humility, sacrifice. I know, I spoke to you some time ago about a diagnostic that we did with our team. You know, “I said this, you heard that.” And I know we’re going to talk a little bit about that. But those are some of the tools that we use just to see how they respond, you know, how, how are they how are they wired, but then how do they respond within those situations. And that kind of gives us a little insight into whether or not they’re going to make it on our team.

Rob Clemons
It’s kind of like when you’re doing an interview, you know, and you you know, some of these information from having them do a test, you can kind of predict the reactions in some cases. So I do want to talk about that a little bit. So I had talked to with you when we first met, and we were talking about DISC assessments. And I was like, I’m an ID now. What were you again?

Terry Scalzitti
Oh, gosh, um, so it’s been a while? Hi, I think, I can’t even remember.

Rob Clemons
There was probably a little ID and you basically and then we talked a little bit about Enneagram. I think at one point, I was a type one on that one, I was the perfectionist. So we had some immediate, like little kindred bond here. And then you told me about this. “I said this, you heard that,” and I had never taken it before. So I want to tell you, for the first time here, what actually tested out as I was gonna hope you could kind of like tell me a little bit about me. Okay. So I took this test, and it came back and said I was a Red.

Terry Scalzitti
Not surprised.

Rob Clemons
All right. All right, I got an a Coleric. So give me a little insight about what that means.

Terry Scalzitti
Yeah, a Red is a driver. I kind of looked at him a driver. And so if you’re a leader, and you’re listening on this podcast right now, if you ever if you take this, which I highly recommend, it’s really great and practical. These are your your great drivers and leaders, um, you love to have reds leading your organization. And the reason why is they’re very goal driven. And they will work toward a goal, they will drive team members to that goal, they will work tirelessly towards that they will stay typically on task. And that’s the benefit of a Red. Because of me, as a leader of an organization. I have a few Reds on my team. And I can usually turn things over to those Reds. And all I have to do is say at one time, hey, I think this is the direction we need to go. Here’s the project, do you think it could drive it to fruition? And they’re excited, they’re chomping at the bit. I don’t even have to go back. They’re emailing me letting me know their progress letting me know what’s happening. And so I love reds for that reason. And so those are the positives with regards to a Red.

Rob Clemons
Oh, boy. Okay, so give me bad.

Terry Scalzitti
So the negative and I say negative but the challenge that Reds have, which I have read in me I’m I’m a high read too. It’s not my primary, but I am a high red. The challenges is sometimes with team members, we can sometimes come off as insensitive. We could come off as not seeing the forest from the trees. So in a meeting, you know, we’re so focused on the goal and driving toward it, that we’re not recognizing that Susie is going through a bitter divorce and it’s really despondent in the meeting and it’s not because Susie doesn’t want to follow through with her opponent, she’s just having a very difficult time. And so a Red sometimes misses those things and just drives toward those where I’m my primary is a Yellow, for most pastors will have that, and a yellow is really a Sanguine and a Sanguine is highly relational. Highly relational, highly attuned, can walk into a room, read a room, look around, see the individuals understand, “okay, that person is having a bad day, this person is having a good day. You know what I’m gonna phrase this questions a little differently, because right now I can see they’re bowing up and I don’t want to lose them. And so I’m just going to couch this question a little bit. I’m gonna give some encouragement.” So a Yellow can read a room and is highly relational, whereas a Red sometimes is that’s not their primary. And so sometimes a red needs a wing person and that person being a Yellow can be a great fit. Because together the Reds gonna drive to the goal, the Yellow is going to make sure that the Red doesn’t stomp on their team.

Rob Clemons
Yeah, I mean, that’s a great tip I was about to ask you, you know what a complementary color would be? Because I know that one of the things I thought was fun, the first time I met you is you told me about Paula, who works with you. He said, she’s a great complement. So she was she?

Terry Scalzitti
She’s a Red. Okay, she’s a high Red: miserable. She’s the one in a meeting where when I will sit there and you know, I do a lot of listening and I and they look for my, I guess, voice and a lot of things. So many times, I’ll be in conversations and won’t have the opportunity to write certain things down. And so Paula is the Red in the room, where she knows all right, Terry, someone just pulled his attention. But he just said he wants this and this and this. And she will write down the three things that I said I was going to do. And afterwards we know each other well enough where I’m going, “okay, Paula, what was it that we decided,” and in, she’ll give that to me, and then I take that, and I run with it, because I’ve got a little bit of Red in me too. And so I like that as well. But yeah, that that’s the compliment.

Rob Clemons
That’s very cool. So one of the things that we do here at Monarch is we, we train our salesman, in particular, to get to recognize a customer’s personality type, without the benefit of having a personality test. You know, so we don’t get it, you know, a customer, please take this personality test, and then we’re going to sell our product. Now, that would be great. Actually, I just thought of that. But that aside, you know, I try to teach them cues to learn their customer. Because ultimately, we tend to like information deliver to us how we like our to our people, we tend to try to present information like we like it presented to us. And that’s all wrong. Because what you realize is, hey, I’m a driver, as you said, so I’m going to give it to you really fast and strated. Whereas you might be one that wants to get a little bit more details and a little bit softer edge. So is there a way that you found because obviously, you need to do this for church members, sometimes. You probably are looking outside, well, this one is a Red, this one’s a Yellow, this one. Give me a couple of cues that you know that you might be doing one or the other.

Terry Scalzitti
Well, first thing is, you know, like using the Red, for example. As Reds, we need to understand our weaknesses. And when we understand our weaknesses, and we if we understand the other colors. And the other two colors that we didn’t mention are Green, which is a peacemaker, and a Green is the one let’s bring everybody together. And let’s all get along. That’s important, especially when you have conflict in a room, but not really great when you have to make tough decisions here. And then you have a Blue, which is your high, high, high perfectionist. And your list maker. And the individual where sometimes though, they’ll get so bogged down in the tree, that they can’t move forward. And so really good for perfection, but not really great about handling a lot of things at one time, because they are a perfectionist. So when you know the weaknesses of your team and all of us have weaknesses, every color has it. Being able to practice some of the elements that you’re not good at, is important. So you mentioned as a Pastor, one of the things empathy is not my greatest suit, that is something that I have to practice. And so when I’m sitting with someone, and they are really, really opening their heart and sharing. I’m a fixer, I’m not, you know, that driver comes out, oh, okay, I already have this three part plan to be able to get you four, I don’t need to hear all this emotional stuff. Well, that’s not good, because I have to pause and practice empathy. So to that point, when you understand everybody’s makeup, or a customer’s makeup, and you’re able to realize this customer needs this, I’m not good at that. So I need to practice this. And what a great opportunity for me to practice this part of my personality, that’s not good. So if you look at it as an opportunity, as opposed to “oh my gosh, I’ve got to sit here and do this,” talking about positive talking about you looking at the best in the situation, that really grows you as a leader and helps you to be better as an individual.

Rob Clemons
Fantastic, you know, so I’m going to do something with you, I hate to put you on the spot. But I want to I want to test you out on a little bit of now, again, you know, I prefer Crowning Connections to be about learn about the people, but also like to talk a little philosophy stuff. So let’s go to Biblical times for anybody who you know, a scholar, if you will. What would you say that? Let’s say what was Paul from the Bible at? Give me his personality type?

Terry Scalzitti
Man, oh, man. Well, you know, I think Paul changed. Yeah, I think I think you saw Paul go through and a lot of personalities. I think, Paul, early on, who was Saul was a Red, because I think Paul chased Christians. In fact, he pursued Christians, because he so wanted to bring them back to justice. So that’s that driver that Red in him. But then you go ahead and you see Paul, later in his life, in prisoned, writing amazing letters. So I think his Red stayed in because he wrote a lot of true, yeah, but then I also think you I think you also see with him the Yellow because he loved people, and because his heart was broken. And so that’s where you begin to see and that’s something within that, that test that you take is you see that you have other complementary colors, colors that you can rise up in your leadership over time. And so I think depending on your experiences in life, whether that is in marriage, whether that’s a divorce, whether you know, whatever it is, when you get hit with those things, you practice a lot of the things that you’re not great at, and that really really grows you as an individual. So that that’s kind of what I would say what happened to it. And we learned a lot from them.

Rob Clemons
Yeah, that’s cool. You know, I was about to start naming a bunch of Biblical figures, I think a lot more and end up is Red, you know, it’s like King David, what was he probably Red?

Terry Scalzitti
I think you saw the same thing. And they all have the same story.

Rob Clemons
You know, a lot of them do you know, which I guess historically speaking, you know, if you made it into the Bible, you probably did some pretty awesome stuff.

Terri Scalzitti
You did. But we, you know, we said this past week, we even said it on Sunday. Sometimes we look at our Biblical heroes, and we call them heroes. Yeah. But if we really analyze their life, they had just as much mess, if not more mess, than we did as individuals. And so that’s what I always say, I love that God uses broken people for his perfect plan. And so for us as leaders, when we fail to realize that even God can use our failure, and so as business leaders to realize it’s okay to make a mistake. It’s okay to step out on faith and make a mistake. Because that’s how you grow and learn. And you can you know, how many, how many amazing leaders of businesses that you and I have studied, can have a testimony where they say, you know what, “I went bankrupt at one point, or I failed, I lost three businesses before I really succeeded.” So if we don’t try to take steps of faith, risking failure, sometimes we’re not trying hard enough in leadership.

Rob Clemons
Gosh, you know, you just said so many things that I just feel like talking about, so I’m gonna, I’m gonna pick a couple of them. One of them is, is it, I had this book, I read one time, it’s called Presidential Courage. And I gotta tell you, you know, you can read self help books all day. But to me, one of the things I pulled out of it is, and it went through George Washington and Lincoln and, you know, some of these Presidents that we think back home, in a manner of like, “wow, you know, top of, you know, top of the food chain and amazing things.” But the great thing about that book to me was, is it didn’t just go into the easy parts. JFK, it didn’t go into the easy parts, it went into the parts where people were after them, people were disagreeing with them, and and really downright, you know, trying to run them out. But historically, they went through and, and are revered in a different way. You know, you look back at them, you don’t remember all the little mistakes they made along the way. And, you know, Ulysses Grant, you know, you don’t look at the little mistakes along the way you went, and you look back at the end result, which was what they did. And so I think that’s an important lesson for everybody kind of tie it off of what you were saying.

Terry Scalzitti
Yeah, we were just talking even even Biblically. I mean, you look at Abraham Lincoln, you look at some of the struggles in his marriage and different things like that, or you could pull out Biblical. We just even talked this past Sunday about King David and we look at David greening Goliath, and he was amazing man after God’s own heart. Amazing. But do you know that actually in Scripture, he’s one of the first recorded cases of depression that we have in the Bible. That he struggled, he was overwhelmed to the point of just wanting to die. And we don’t look at our Biblical heroes in that light. We don’t look at David. I know David had his act together. He was amazing. No, he wasn’t. He struggled and had seasons of despairs, like anybody. So that’s why like, as leader, sometimes we feel like we have to be perfect and always on. No, we’re human. And we can make mistakes. And that’s why we say seasons, like we started it, every leader is going to have a difficult season, and they’re going to have an amazing season. But the seasons always changing. They always come.

Rob Clemons
Right, right. And you gotta be ready for these, you know, it’s gonna be peaks and valleys. And it’s the way you approach them. That makes all the difference, right. Yeah, very, very powerful stuff. And I really appreciate that. You know, one of the things that I want to ask you is we have, and I’m quicksave way I might even go back to that, but quick safeway, so Thanksgiving is coming up. What kind of stuff do you guys do at the church, you know, to celebrate Thanksgiving and, and you know, to make a difference for the community, maybe?

Terry Scalzitti
Oh, that’s really good. A couple of things. And we partner with our Myrtle Beach schools. And like, right now we’re getting ready for the holiday season. And so some of the things that we do: we did a jacket drive last year during the wintertime comes up in to make sure that every child doesn’t go cold in the winter months. And we gave them all jackets, and and so we did that last year, this year, we’re going to be adopting children at the schools and to be able to help give them a better holiday season. I know that’s speaking more to Christmas. But we’re kind of at that point. Thanksgiving, believe it or not, we actually attacked that about a month ago, because we’re a little bit ahead of that. But helping…

Rob Clemons
Good leadership, by the way.

Terry Scalzitti
I got a good team. But we went ahead and donated over two tons of food to helping hand to be able to provide for individuals within the community. And that’s something we’re at our church. I’m very proud of our church every month we have a specific partner in the Myrtle Beach area that that we’ve have established. And so we have a rhythm in our church where our church members know that every month we’re going to be doing and giving back to our community. So the Christmas season we’re doing Operation Christmas Child right now. We are the flagship for the area, the regional host site, so everybody brings their boxes to us. But every year hundreds and hundreds of boxes are given to children of need around the world. And so we do that and we’re collecting actually this Sunday, that I mentioned, the next thing is Myrtle Beach schools. So a lot going on in our church and that’s the thing you know, if you were to ask me and sorry for the little bit of selfish plug there, but the thing I love most about our churches, a lot of churches and I’ve been there I’ve been a part of churches where we fall into this. We fall into looking inside too often. We stop looking into the community that I know you’re much minded in. And so and I think the greatest growth that church can have is when a church realizes its responsibility to influence the community. And so that’s something that our church talks about a season, every month, we have our hands in the community, whether it be Habitat for Humanity, Myrtle Beach schools, Helping Hand, all these organizations we partner with every single month. So I’m excited.

Rob Clemons
Man, wow, that’s, that’s powerful. You know, I know what Monarch we do have our 10% Community Pledge. So 10% of our net proceeds, or our net profits, go back to the community. And that’s, that’s powerful for us. And probably the hardest part of it is to decide how we want to use that money. You know, of course, we have a Roof for Troops. And we always want to, you know, celebrate our veterans and help them out and you know, all the the other little things we do, but how do you guys make that decision? Sometimes it’s tough, right? There’s so many things you could do.

Terry Scalzitti
It is and you know, but here’s the here’s something that guiding principle that we are not every church is for everybody. And not every church is for every local partner. That’s why there’s many churches, much like for Monarch, there’s a lot of different roofing companies that are out there. And so Monarch is not the only roofing company. Not everybody’s going to be for Monarch. So when you realize that, you know what, there’s other individuals in the area that can support other needs. But what can we do? And so we strategically, really spend time looking at the partnerships. Are we duplicating a partnerships? You know, and because we figure, there’s a lot of partners out there, we have one that’s in this category, let’s make this our partner and let’s really partner with them. And I think sometimes when we, when we’re there’s an old adage from the movie, The Patriot, it’s one of my favorite, where he says “Aim small, miss small.” And that’s kind of a little bit of a idea that we use. And so if we aim small on those targets, and we choose strategic ones, and then we go after it, and partner every year, we make a bigger difference and bigger impact. So that’s kind of a little bit of our approach.

Rob Clemons
That’s pretty, that’s pretty cool stuff. I want to ask you, then. So other than the Bible, is there a book that you’ve read that has made a big difference for you, or something you’re reading right now that you really enjoy?

Terry Scalzitti
Oh wow. Well, I’m a big Patrick Lencioni fan. He is his leadership talks have been just amazing, and really influenced a lot of my leadership style. And so I’ve mentioned Five Dysfunctions of a Team, I know to you in the past, that is, for any leader that’s out there that should be one of your first books is how to build a team that works together. Five Dysfunctions of a Team.

Rob Clemons
Five Dysfunctions of a Team.

Terry Scalzitti
That should be on your Mount Rushmore of leadership books, it should make your four I tell you that one of the other books that I’m reading right now with a group of individuals is Five Temptations of a CEO. And it really leads a little bit to those dysfunctions. But it really guides you into how can I make sure that I don’t fall into the typical temptations that any leader of an organization will run into. One of those I mentioned earlier, and that is that I’m working on that I have to do a better job on is, you know, we as we’re tempted sometimes because of humanity of our team, not to be extremely clear with our expectations for a team member. Because we want to soften it or we want to, you know, make sure that they leave the meeting feeling better. And so we don’t necessarily really clearly spell out this is the expectation, and we need to understand it, and we need to move toward it for the betterment of the organization. And so when we don’t do that, then we have a team member who thinks they’re doing a great job, and then all of a sudden, you get to the end, you’re frustrated, they’re frustrated. And then really, where does the blame fall. Really blame, it really falls on the leader because we’ve not done the right job of setting clear expectations. So that’s from that book that I’m reading right now. So as you can tell, it’s it’s asked me depending on the month, and I’ll tell you a different book. Yeah, but that’s the one that I’m currently reading right now.

Rob Clemons
I love that. You got to be a student of the game, of management sometimes. Um, you know, one thing that I was gonna say, I interview a lot of people here, you know, we’re always hiring. So we’re always interviewing. And I asked a lot of times, I’ll say, you know, tell me something about the last company you’re at, that you were disappointed by. And I’ll get all kinds of great answers, you know, because they give me a peek into somebody’s mind. But one thing that I don’t think business leaders recognize enough, and I’m going to play off of what you said, is that, they’ll say something to the effect of, and I’ve heard this a lot of times enough that I’m gonna actually mention it, they say, “you know, I was at the company for four or five years, and I never got a review.” And, and I think business leaders are going, “oh, man, if I give them a if I do my yearly review, I don’t have to give them a raise.” Which by the way, you have to do that, you know, with the cost of living going up, you always need to be mindful of your people. You don’t want any employee on your staff that can’t pay their bills, right. So but the other part of that is, is I find it so perplexing, because it’s so easy to do, to sit down with that person year over year and say, look, here’s here’s some goals for you for the coming year. And let’s look at your your goals from last year. It gives you such a great way to to go through and look at somebody look at the progress. One of my favorite things is I was actually talking about one of our employees the other day when my HR person, and we went into his file, and I still have the interview form from our first interview. And I gotta tell you, it’s fun for me, because I look back and I saw his answers and I can see his review one year in two years and you can see the growth of people. How do you do your views for your staff? I mean, what do you recommend there?

Terry Scalzitti
Yeah, really quickly. It’s one of the things You actually it ties into the question you asked me, “What are the things that you limit maybe from an organization you work from before?” And that was one of the things that I lamented is we never were reviewed, we never had anybody talk about any kind of salary increases, merit increases. So it was always in the dark. And you always were left wondering, what’s what is going to happen? So one of the things we set out at our church was, number one, we set salary bands for every single position based upon the country. So we looked at every two years, we reset those salary bands, looking at every position to make sure that are we doing the right thing? You know, if another organization or church comes in and they offer more money, are we going to lose great people? Because we’re not paying them well enough? So that’s number one is understand, “hey, how are we doing? As from a top level standpoint? Are we paying people the way we should pay?” And then number two is we do a yearly review process. But within the year, so we’ll set goals like much like you will sit down? What are the goals, and we’ll work through it, discuss it and we’ll realize them it will say, “okay, these are the goals.” And then twice during the year, we will set just sit down, informal conversations and look back at those goals. Have those goals change? Should they change? You know, are you struggling in them? And we give them an assessment as to “Hey, great job,” or, “Hey, I noticed we’re not really getting any of our goals done. So here are the things that I’m seeing. And I really want to encourage you and let me write some of these down to be able to help, okay, are we clear, we need to see some movement on these goals.” And then we’ll meet one more time. And that gives us an opportunity to say, you know, we’re not getting any traction. And you know, at the end of the year, we have a review. And I’m just telling you, we’re three quarters of the year through and you’re realizing we haven’t hit any of your goals. So I don’t want to do any…, I don’t want there to be any surprises when we get to the end. So understand where we’re at today and really want to challenge it, we got to get a move on. So that’s why it makes it easy for me as a leader at the end of the year to sit down. I the past three years, I don’t think I’ve ever had a surprise at a meeting, they usually walk in and understand. This is where I’m at. And then we base as an organization, we look at salary bands, we look at the type of year it is, you know, is it a good year? Is it a down year? A pandemic year? And then we make decisions on? Is there a standard of living increase? Is there a merit increase? And those are all we have a team of people that really kind of look through that.

Rob Clemons
And you know that that’s such a great business building advice for anybody. And and I feel like that because you never should come into our view, surprised. I mean, and that’s really the goal. And sometimes I’ll have managers and we have different divisions here. So I have managers that work underneath me. And they’ll come to me and they’ll say, you know, I’m struggling with this employee a little bit, I’m not sure what to do. And I’ll say, you know, have a preliminary review. You know, sit down with them and say, “Look, we’re 90 days out from your your year end review. And these are some things that you can do to build upon so that you have a really good review when we get to the one year.” And I feel like those are that that kind of ties in with what you were saying. So what we’re running towards the back end of this, so I want to give you a couple of chances to hear a little rapid fire. So favorite book of the Bible?

Terry Scalzitti
Oh God

Rob Clemons
Like I”m done with the rapid fire.

Terry Scalzitti
It’s really tough. Oh, my favorite book. It’s got to be one of the Gospels. And I would probably say Luke, Luke was a doctor shared. So he was very meticulous in his writing. And so a lot of the different examples he uses, like the stories of Jesus, are really detailed. And so I love poking holes in the details. So probably would be Luke.

Rob Clemons
You know what’s cool about the Gospels, if you ask people, you find clear answers for Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John and which one speaks to you. I asked my dad one time and he and he enjoys John the most.

Terry Scalzitti
Oh, yeah, that’s good.

Rob Clemons
Yeah. And he had a backup for why you know, so it’s pretty cool. I always enjoy Matthew myself. You know, and you have The Matthew Principle, which is still like an economic principle, which I think is kind of cool, too. What? What inspires you?

Terry Scalzitti
Oh, gosh, you know, that’s a really tough question. People do. And I know, it’s, it’s funny, we have a joke in ministry. And I always say ministry be wonderful if it wasn’t for people. And we joke in that, but on the positive side, it’s the flip side is the reason why we’re in ministry is because of people. And so to be able to see individuals who I guess for me as individuals who really, really hit a difficult season, and to be able to see and we stayed in church to see God really impact their life, and them take steps of faith. And to be able to see them in a matter of a few months, really in a different place, emotionally, spiritually, just in their lives. That that inspires me and inspires me to just keep doing what I’m doing. And if it wasn’t for the people, I wouldn’t be doing what I’m doing. And so I know it’s a general answer in nature, but it really is people.

Rob Clemons
Yes, great answer. What did you want to do when you were a little boy? Now I’m gonna say that because some people might say, “hey, look, I want to be a minister,” you know, but what did you want to be when you were little?

Terry Scalzitti
I did not want to be a pastor. Yeah. God get drew me kicking and scratching. And but what I wanted to be was a Baseball Coach. And I was I was a high school baseball coach. I was a secondary education teacher. I was living the dream and doing the job that I really love to do. And I wanted to coach in college, and I was on that path. And then God decided, miraculously to say, “Nope, you’re not going to do this. You’re going to be a Pastor.” And that’s I don’t have enough time to tell you that story. But it is it’s a it’s a powerful, miraculous story that that’s the only the reason why I’m a Pastor is because he made it extremely clear.

Rob Clemons
Made it very clear. And it sounds like a part two. I would love to do that. Same thing with my father, you know, I mean, it wasn’t like he was born into it and said, “I’m going to do this one day” He was called, it was called very clearly. So you know, very, very cool stuff. Any one thing you will want to kind of tell us about yourself for the church on as the last thought?

Terry Scalzitti
You know, I look at it as we talk about this leadership podcast. You know, one of the things that I’ve shared with our churches is we, you know, the church is not a business. However, the church does act like a business, because we have some of the same principles that we have to we’re an organization. We have payroll. We have all those things. And so, you know, many people look at churches, and they say, “Well, it’s the church.” You know, so you know, we excuse the church for having bad business principles, because they’re a church. I actually look at it oppositely. I look at churches and say, “No, as churches, we shouldn’t be the best business in every city.” We should have businesses coming to our doors asking us what are your HR policies? How are you treating people, because we should be the ones treating people the best, and having the greatest wisdom with regards to how we do our practices, because we understand the word of God. And for me, my wisdom comes from Scripture. And so, that really drives our organization. How can we be the best in HR? How can we be the best at our Christmas parties? What are the most amazing… this is why I love what you do, Rob. This gives them, that’s why I was drawn to you, because I see you doing some of those things here at Monarch and just really exciting, creative things to be able to have with your team and and challenging them. And if we’re the best business in the community, as the church, then we know we’re going to have an impact and we’re going to influence the best. So that’s what I would say is from a leadership standpoint.

Rob Clemons
It’s so very, very powerful. And I gotta tell anybody that’s listening. I mean, you’re the real deal. You know, we’ve talked off off the radio here, and just about how much you care about it and how you really take responsibility and doing the right by your people. And I just find it amazing. So Pastor Terry, Ocean View Baptist Church, has been great having you today. Thanks for being with us.

Terry Scalzitti
Thank you, Rob. I appreciate it.

Rob Clemons
Alright, thanks. And this is Rob Clemens. I’m going to sign off with Crown Connections and we’ll see you guys next time.

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Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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